Nautical Tales, Yarns and Biographies page one.


NEW ZEALAND



See also Shipwrecks and Maritime Disasters

  • From Kauri Trees to Sunlit Seas
  • The Sea is my Wife
  • Swirly World Sails South
  • Tasman Trespasser II
  • Lucky Goes to Sea
  • Into the Midnight Sun
  • Ordinary Women Extraordinary Lives
  • Ordinary Women Extraordinary Lives
  • Riding with Whales
  • Weather Permitting
  • The Price of Bacon

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    FROM KAURI TREES TO SUNLIT SEAS.
    Shoestring Shipping in the South Pacific.
    By Don Silk, Paperback, 0.55kg, 155mm x 235mm, 234 pages.First Published 1994. Reprinted 2014 .
    (Note: We have been fortunate to be in contact with Don Silks family and acquire copies of this book, which is now out of print)

    From Kauri Trees to Sunlit Seas recounts Don Silks adventures in the Pacific over neary four decades. During this time, vessels were bought and sold, rebuilt and wrecked, cargos of coconuts and corned beef, pineapples and pearl shells were transported, along with crazy English beachcombers and Mormon Missionaries complete with bicycles. The excitement of hurricanes and shipwrecks, stoways and drunken sea captains was matched by the challenge of outwitting officialdom.

    A born storyteller, Don Silk has written a rip roaring yarn, awash with thrilling adventurres and mishaps. It is the story of an exceptional way of life, now all but gone forever.

    NZ$35.00 + delivery.

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    THE SEA IS MY WIFE.
    The life of Donald Cairncross Todd.
    By Gordon Berry, Paperback, 0.42kg, 145mm x 205mm, 284 pages.Published 2007 .
    Donald Cairncross Todd was born in Wellington and lived his formative years there before being sent to Nelson College for his secondary education. During his growing up in Eastbourne he and a friend built a small launch that they steamed across Cook Strait to the Marlborough Sounds. After serving an electrical apprenticeship and a time in the Chatham Islands he went back to the "Sounds" where he became involved in a guest house and launch charter work. Later an electrical contracting business was started and covered the top of the South Island. The sea was always his first love and after many years, and vessels, Don is now officially "retired" from both electrical and commercial boating.

    Now in his late seventies, in his retirement, he still wires boats, houses and commercial buildings.

    NZ$35.00 + delivery.

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    SWIRLY WORLD SAILS SOUTH.
    By Andrew Fagan, Paperback, 0.42kg, 153mm x 233mm, 288 pages. Published June 2012.
    In 2007, Kiwi musician and radio personality Andrew Fagan set sail in his tiny 5.4-metre plywood yacht to circumnavigate New Zealand. And just to make it more difficult, he included a leg to the sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands in the notorious Southern Ocean.
    All in all he sailed over 3000 miles (around 5000km) in two months. facing such potentially lethal conditions in such a tiny craft took careful planning mixed with extreme determination, serious fortitude and uncommon daring.
    In this account of his voyage, Fagan tells of having to avoid icebergs, sail through a force ten storm and visit sites of shipwercks at Port Ross in the Auckland Island Group. 'With the genuine concern of a very fatigued person, I was sailing for my life and I knew it!'
    Swirly World Sails South is a sharply accurate and humorous narrative that offers a unique and refreshing perspective on the world of solo sailing.

    NZ$35.00 + delivery.

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    TASMAN TRESPASSER II. The Shaun Quincey Story

    By Shaun Quincey. Paperback. 153mm x 232mm, 270 pages, full colour photographs.
    YOU CAN, YOU WILL. These were the words Shaun woke up to every morning when rowing across the Tasman.
    In 1977, Colin Quincey became the first man to row the Tasman. Forty years later his son Shaun decided to emulate his father - rowing the other way.
    His father's boat was the Tasman Trespasser, and when Shaun decided to build and row Tasman Trespasser II, he knew it wasn't going to be easy. At the time he owned little more than a drum kit and a heap of dreams. While he was at home in the water - an experienced lifesaver and swimmer - in his own words he had never been so scared, had less money, been laughed at as much or been so unprepared for anything in his life.
    That he succeeded is history - that he set a new record, testament to personal endurance and sheer tenacity, as well as the skill with which he designed and built his boat. In a nailbiting, funny, poignant and inspring modern-day adventure, Shaun Quincey shares the physical and mental challenges and utter exhiliration of pitting yourself against something way bigger and way more unforgiving than anything you'll ever face in a life more ordinary. Don't miss a moment.

    NZ$42.00 + Delivery

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    LUCKY GOES TO SEA.
    By Frank Robson. Paperback. 130mm x 200mm, 232 pages, black and white photos.
    In Lucky For Me, Frank Robson and his partner, Leisa, rescued Lucky, a mischievous, cream-coloured terrier on Death Row, and embraced him as the third member of their high-spirited, boat-mad family.

    Now Lucky Goes to Sea takes you on an unforgettable journey, with a four-legged hero guaranteed to make you laugh, and steal your heart.

    NZ$28.00 + Delivery

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    INTO THE MIDNIGHT SUN.
    By Barbara Thomas. Paperback, 0.55Kg, 160mm x 237mm, 168 pages, full colour photographs, published 2011.
    We all have our dreams and most of us never turn them into reality - but this adventurous Kiwi couple did. Neil and Barbara Thomas's vision was to put to sea for an extended voyage across the Pacific Ocean, heading north, from New Zealand to Japan and Alaska. It is about life on board their 'tiny ship' Starlight, calling into beautiful exotic ports, and indeed one or two hell holes.
    But Barbara describes the extraordinary places and wildlife they encountered - from undisturbed remains of WWII Japanese submarines and zeroes to grizzly bears gorging themselves on salmon. It is a story of friendships formed and extraordinarily genereous locals who helped them along the way.

    NZ$45.00 + delivery.

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    ORDINARY WOMEN EXTRAORDINARY LIVES, In The Fishing Industry.
    By Heather Heberley. Pbk, 150mm x 210mm, 245 pages, colour and monochrome photographs.
    This is the authors fifth book, it is a delightful and inspiring story of New Zealand women, many of whom call themselves "just ordinary". How very far from ordinary they and their lives actually are becomes plain from the beginning. Courage, strength of character, humour - here are so many touching stories. They range from hand-on fishing and diving to the many skills needed in aspects of management, research and policing the seas in New Zealand waters and around the world.
    New Zealand was the first country to introduce an all embracing quota management scheme, and is up with the leading fishing countries in the places women have won for themselves in the fishing industry.
    Everyone wants to conserve fish stocks. Heather Heberley opens up a whole new world of science and enterprise, threaded through with love stories and the seizing of triumph from disaster.
    With her fishing and farming family on Arapawa Island in Tory Channel, she has herself gone fishing for crayfish, groper, school shark and tuna, and taken part in fisheries research. All four of her previous books have been bestsellers - Weather Permitting, Flood Tide, Riding with Whales, Last of the Whalers. In this book, she celebrates a vital part of the natural world, and women who belong in it.

    NZ$31.00 + delivery.

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    RIDING WITH WHALES.
    By Heather Heberley. Paperback, 148mm x 210mm, 260 pages.
    Heather Heberley in her first two books, Weather Permitting and Flood Tide, wrote about her own life on Arapawa Island in Queen Charlotte Sound. While she researched, she talked to many other women who had spent most or all of their lives in the remote Sounds.
    This book, Riding with Whales, began because of these meetings and the huge admiration she feels for these older women, all pioneers in their way.
    They have great stories to tell about a way of life now mainly gone forever. The impact of whaling on nearly every family, the awesome responsibility for their children's futures whent he women were their only teachers, and the unbelievable differences which electricity eventually made to their lives - all of these and much more thread through this delightful book.
    The lives of the thirteen women featured in this book, two maori, eleven Pakeha, cover a large part of the 20th century. Their stories are dramatic, funny and tragic in turn, and always touching in the honesty with which they talk to Heather Heberley. Nobody complains. Nobody dwells on her health problems. As one of them says, looking back on a life of physical danger, loneliness, huge responsibilities and sheer, unremitting hard work, "it's just the way it was."

    NZ$31.00 + delivery.

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    WEATHER PERMITTING.
    By Heather Heberley. Paperback, 138mm x 210mm, 222 pages.
    Young Heather Heberley, coming as a bride form Auckland to a remote bay in the Marlborough Sounds, did not realise how much the words, weather permitting, were to rule her life. Sea tragedies, the sinking of the Mikhail Lermontov, her husband Joe's role in search and rescues where the rescuers' own lives were at risk - all these are detailed alongside the often funny, sometimes tragic aspects of the Heberleys' farming and fishing life.

    Heather Heberley's unassuming but robust story shows how she grows into a mother, mechanic, plumber, teacher, farmer, nurse, woolclasser, and licensed skipper. She changes from a young townie into a confident capable woman. This is a love story. The mutual love and respect of her family nourishes her capacity to learn, and to shape, laugh at and enjoy her own life.

    More than a million people each year pass the South Island's isolated 'first house on the right' on Arapawa Island, just inside Tory Channel. Heather's marriage into the well-known Heberley clan and her arrival, in 1963, at their bay, have given her the fascinating and formative experiences that make up this compelling autobiography.

    NZ$30.00 + delivery.

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    THE PRICE OF BACON.
    By Jeanette Aplin. Paperback, 0.43 kg, 148mm x 210mm, 296 pages, colour photographs. Published in 2011.
    With the lighthouse-keeping era far behind them, author Jeanette Aplin and husband Pip have built their small home on the sparsely populated D'Urville Island which forms the rugged western boundary of the outer Marlborough Sounds. Here they have neither roads nor electricity to their property but, thanks to Pip, a solar panel powers the author's laptop and printer.
    With Pip constantly away working full-time as a builder, Jeanette home-alone cherishes a dream. She will keep a pair of Kunekune pigs, New Zealand's special breed whose origins are shrouded in mystery - 'cheerful, wide-mounthed smiling pigs that will talk to me and follow me round like a dog'...
    With her trade-mark candour and humour, the author writes her story as she lives it, building layer upon layer and leading us intimately into a life that is very different but compellingly universal.
    It is also 'an accidental love story', not just with the pigs but about wildlife, husband, family and friends, and always the island itself.

    NZ$39.00 + delivery.

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    Nautical Tales, Yarns and Biographies page one.



    See also Shipwrecks and Maritime Disasters

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