POLAR HISTORY Page one.



See also: Nautical History and Nautical Dictionaries

  • We Three Go South
  • Scott of the Antarctic
  • The Last Expedition
  • Race to the End
  • Still Life - Inside the Antarctic Huts of Scott and Shackleton
  • The Worst Journey in the World
  • Cherry
  • Shackleton's Way
  • South - HB
  • South - PB Stanfords Travel Classics
  • South - PB
  • The Endurance (Hardback)
  • South With Endurance
  • Frank Worsley - Shackelton's Fearless Captain
  • Shackleton's Boat Journey
  • Endurance
  • A History of Arctic Exploration
  • Terra Incognita
  • Mawson's Forgotton Men
  • What Ship? Lieutenant Harry Pennell's Antarctic Legacy
  • Buy on line using our secure pages, by clicking on the buttons below each review

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    WE THREE GO SOUTH.
    By Ethel Richardson. Cynthia Cass. Paperback, 0.50Kg, 210mm x 240mm, 151 pages, Sepia and coloured paintings and drawings. Published 2014.
    Features the diary of Ethel Richardson who, with her two sisters, made a voyage to the Sub-Antarctic Islands of New Zealand in 1890 when they were aged 18 to 24.

    Cynthia Cass talks about her book and her connection to the three intrepid women....

    "They travelled on the government steamship “Hinemoa” which serviced lighthouses around the coast and was establishing castaway depots for survivors of shipwrecks on the southern islands. Ethel Richardson was my great aunt. Her eldest sister on the right in the photo is my grandmother who married the ships carpenter from the Hinemoa. They settled on the farm near Pahiatua where I live today.

    The diary and an accompanying sketch book have some delightfully amusing drawings of their daring escapades as they journeyed from Wellington round the south of the South Island then to the Snares Auckland, Campbell, Antipodes and Bounty Islands. They displayed an ability to make fun from the simplest of things and teased the sailors on board unmercifully".

    "I visited the Islands in 2001 and 2007 and have produced a series of paintings which were shown at various exhibitions when the book was launched. The paintings attempt to show what the islands are like and the book is a fascinating insight into the life of young women of the day. Clad in long dresses and high buttoned boots, they had little to protect them from the freezing conditions but they appeared to be willing to row boats and ramble over rocky terrain with gusto. The description of their landing on the Antipodes illustrates how intrepid they were. A sketch of them going after parakeets on the Antipodes shows that these islands are one of the few places on earth where wild beauty has existed unchanged for over a hundred years."

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    SCOTT OF THE ANTARCTIC.
    By David Crane. Paperback, 0.5Kg, 129mm x 197mm, 637 pages, monochrome photographs. Published 2012.
    Lionised by the British public as the embodiment of selfless heroism, Scott's achievements and the tragic failure of his final expedition 100 years ago have long captured the imagination.
    David Crane's definitive biography brings the man behind the legend to life, allowing Scott's voice to echo through its pages. Whether describing the landscape of Antarctica in all its fatal, icy beauty, or giving an account of the monumental challenges he faced both on his adventures and in his personal life, Scott emerges as an extraordinary figure, a superlative leader of men in possibly the harshest environment on the planet.

    NZ$27.00 + Delivery

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    THE LAST EXPEDITION.
    By Robert Falcon Scott. Paperback, 0.38Kg, 130mm x 197mm, 497 pages, monochrome photographs. Published 2012.
    This book is Captain's Scott's gripping account of his expedition to the South Pole between 1910 and 1912. It was a voyage of scientific discovery and a heroic exploration of the last unconquered wilderness. Scott's expedition, carried in the
  • Terra Nova, pitted him and his team not only against the elements but also against the Norwegian explorer, Amundsen. Ultimately, Scott was beaten by both. The journals are full of incident and drama, courage and endurance, hope and bitter disappointment. These journals were found, along with Scott's body, several months after his death and just eleven miles from base camp and safety.

    NZ$28.00 + Delivery

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    RACE TO THE END.
    By Ross D.E. MacPhee. Hardback in a slipcase, 1.3Kg, 235mm x 235mm, 245 pages, full colour and monochrome photographs and foldout maps. Published 2010.
    One hundred years ago, England's Robert Falcon Scott and Norwegian Roald Amundsen each set out on a dangerous quest to be the first explorer to reach the South Pole. Neither could have foreseen that the race between them would culminate in grand heroism, fearsome tragedy, and, for later generations, powerful stories and lingering myths about the real significance of the 'heroic' age of exploration.
    Race to the End takes you along on each team's trek to the one place on earth that was at the time still almost completely unexplored. While both groups faced some of the harshest conditions found anywhere, Amundsen and Scott made starkly different choices about how to meet and overcome the challenges of the Antarctic environment. Amundsen may have won the race, but the ensuing war of perception concerning who was the greater explorer continues to this day - was it Amundsen, the machinelike competitor who had but one goal in mind, or Scott, for whom scientific exploration was just as important as standing, for one brief moment, at 90 degrees south?
    While the book focuses closely on expedition leaders Scott and Amundsen, there are also revealing portraits of other members and their motivations - whether they came for fame and the thrill that comes from testing one's physical limits, or for the equally profound excitement generated by undertaking novel scientific investigations where no one else had. MacPhee's piercing insight and keen storytelling not only illuminate the geographical, logistical, and scientific details of the quest for the South Pole but also reveal the complex and very human side of those who participated in these expeditions.

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    STILL LIFE - INSIDE THE ANTARCTIC HUTS OF SCOTT AND SHACKLETON.
    Photography By Jane Ussher, Essays by Nigel Watson. Hardback, 2 Kg, 246mm x 320mm, 224 pages, full colour photographs and seven gatefolds .
    This is a unique and hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton. New Zealand photographer Jane Ussher was given the unique opporunity to photograph the huts in intimate detail, a never to be repeated experience. At the turn of the twentieth century Antarctica was the focus of one of the last great races of exploration and discovery. Known as the 'heroic age', from 1895 to 1917 Antarctic explorers set off from their huts in search of adventure, science and glory but some, such as Scott, were never to return. The World Wars intervened and the huts were left as time capsules of Edwardian life; a portrait of King Edward VII hangs amid seal blubber, sides of mutton, a jar of gherkins, penguin eggs, cufflinks and darned trousers. One of New Zealand's best known photographers, Jane Ussher, was invited by the Antarctic Heritage Trust to record 'the unusual, the hidden and minutiae of these sites'. The Executive Director of the Trust, Nigel Watson, provides a fascinating introduction to the history and atmosphere of each hut and detailed photographic captions.

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    THE WORST JOURNEY IN THE WORLD.
    By Cherry-Garrard. Paperback, 128mm x 197mm, 607 pages.
    This is a gripping account of an expedition gone disastrously wrong. One of the youngest members of Scott's team, Apsley Cherry-Garrard was later part of the rescue party that found the frozen bodies of Scott and the three men who had accompanied him on the final push to the Pole. Despite the horrors that Scott and his men eventually faced, Cherry-Garrard's account is filled with details of scientific discovery and anecdotes of human resilience in a harsh environment, supported by diary excerpts and accounts from other explorers. A masterpiece of travel writing, The Worst Journey in the World is the most celebrated and compelling of all the books on Antarctic exploration.

    NZ$36.00 + Delivery

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    CHERRY. A life of Apsley Cherry-Garrard.
    By Sara Wheeler. Paperback, 129mm x 198mm, 354 pages, black & white photographs.
    Apsley Cherry-Garrard (1886-1959) was one of the youngest members of Captain Scott's final expedition to the Antarctic. Cherry undertook an epic journey in the Antarctic winter to collect the eggs of the Emperor penguin. The temperature fell to seventy below, it was dark all the time, his teeth shattered in the cold and the tent blew away. 'But we kept our tempers,' Cherry wrote, 'even with God'.

    After serving in the First World War Cherry was invalided home, and with the zealous encouragement of his neighbour Bernard Shaw he wrote a masterpiece. In The Worst Journey in the World Cherry transformed tragedy and grief into something fine. But as the years unravelled he faced a terrible struggle against depression, breakdown and despair, haunted by the possibility that he could have saved Scott and his companions.

    This is the first biography of Cherry. Sara Wheeler, who has travelled extensively in the Antarctic, has had unrestriced access to new material and the full co-operation of Cherry's family.

    NZ$29.50 + Delivery

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    SHACKLETON'S WAY, Leadership lessons from the great Antarctic explorer
    By Margot Morell & Stephanie Capparell. Pbk, 128mm x 197mm, 238 pages, monochrome photographs.
    Sir Ernest Shackleton has been called "the greatest leader that ever came on God's earth, bar none" for saving the lives of the twentyseven men stranded with him on an Antarctic ice floe for almost two years.

    Written by two veteran business observers, Shackleton's Way details universal leadership tactics set against the thrilling survival story of the Endurance expedition. Whether it's hiring good workers, supporting and inspiring employees to do their best, managing a crisis with limited personnel and resources, creating order out of chaos, or leading by personal example with optimism, egalitarianism, humour, strength, ingenuity, intelligence and compassion, Ernest Shackleton set an example we can all follow. Illustrated with photographer Frank Hurley's masterpieces and other rarely seen photo's, Shackleton's Way is filled with fascinating and practical lessons of a leader who succeeded by putting people first and triumphing brilliantly when all the odds were against him.

    Was NZ$25.00 + Delivery

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    SOUTH, The illustrated story of Shackleton's last Expedition 1914-1917
    By Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton. Hardback, 1.63kg. 214mm x 262mm, 382 pages. Published 2016.
    Sir Ernest Shackleton’s classic account of his Imperial Trans-Atlantic Expedition presented in a beautifully illustrated edition.
    In 1914 the explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton, five years removed from his last Antarctic adventure, announced the details of an ambitious overland trek from the Atlantic to the Pacific via the South pole. First published in 1919, Shackleton’s account of the Imperial Trans-Atlantic Expedition became and instant adventure and survival classic. Now, nearly a century later, it’s presented in a beautifully designed and illustrated edition.
    Alternately harrowing and inspiring is an incredible first-person tale of preparation, peril and perseverance. It’s also a compelling account of decisive leadership in the face of adversity. Within these covers, Shackleton’s crackling prose is illustrated with a wide selection of stunning photographs created by frank Hurley, the talented Australian who accompanied Shackleton, as well as paintings by expedition member George Marston and modern colour photographs depicting seascapes, landscapes , and fauna as the expedition might have seen them one hundred years ago. The result is a beautiful and unique tribute to the feats of Shackleton and his men.

    NZ$55.00 + Delivery

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    SOUTH Stanfords Travel Classics.
    By Sir Ernest Shackleton. Paperback, 0.37kg. 127mm x 197mm, 316 pages.
    Ernest Shackleton sailed to the South Pole as the First World War broke out in Europe, intent on making the first ever trans-Antarctic crossing. South! is Shackleton’s first-hand account of the epic expedition, which he describes as ‘the last great journey on earth’. During the journey their ship, the Endurance, became trapped by ice and was crushed, forcing he men to survive and escape from one of the world’s most hostile environments. With o hope of rescue, Shackelton and four others set sail in a small open boat on a 600 mile crossing to South Georgia. Shipwrecked on the uninhabited side of the island, they were forced into making the first ever winter crossing of the island, all the time threatened by brutal cold and hunger. South!, made Shackleton’s name as an explorer. The dramatic story, one of the most astonishing feats of polar escapology, remains as enthralling as when it was first published in 1919.

    NZ$30.00 + Delivery

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    SOUTH, The last Antarctic expedition of Shackleton and the Endurance
    By Sir Ernest Shackleton. Paperback, 0.32kg. 130mm x 200mm, 358 pages.
    Attempting to become the first person to cross the entire Antarctic continent from sea to sea, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his ship become trapped in pack ice. After the ship sank, stranding him and his men on the ice with dwindling supplies, Shackleton realises that the only way to save himself, and his crew, is to set off in an open boat across the polar waters to seek help. This is the classic and most famous story of survival. A great feat of seamanship and a tribute to the name of the ship, Endurance.

    This brand new edition includes new maps showing the route taken by the Endurance, and also the route taken by Shackleton in his desperate race for help. The foreword is written by explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes who draws on his own experiences in the Antarctic and celebrates Shackleton's ability to turn disaster into a heroic story of survival.

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    THE ENDURANCE, Shackleton's Legendary Antarctic Expedition
    By Caroline Alexander. Hbk, 215mm x 240mm, 214 pages, monochrome photographs.
    This is a new edition of the original paperback. The quality of the photographs is considerably improved and it is indeed difficult to appreciate the time and circumstances when they were taken. A new dimension to this narrative is created by these wonderful photographs.
    In August 1914, Sir Ernest Shackelton and a crew of twenty-seven set sail aboard the Endurance bound for the South Atlantic - their goal to be the first explorers ever to cross Antarctic. Weaving a treacherous path through the icy Weddell Sea, they came within eighty miles of their destination when the ship became trapped in the ice pack. For the next ten months they waited for the ice to break, but it never did, instead crushing the Endurance in its floes, leaving the crew stranded.
    An extraordinary book and a miraculous survival story, Caroline Alexander has produced a thrilling book of the most perilous journey of them all. This book is an essential read for all those who have been intrigued by this tale of high adventure.

    NZ$84.00 + Delivery

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    SOUTH WITH ENDURANCE
    SHACKLETON'S ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION 1914-1917

    By Frank Hurley. Pbk, 240mm x 228mm, 1.08kg 244 pages, monochrome and colourised photographs.
    A new edition of the definitive and spell-binding record of Shackleton's legendary expedition, as captured by pioneering photographer Frank Hurley.

    Sir Ernest Shackleton's trans-Antarctic expedition of 1914-1917 was one of the great feats of human endurance -- one vividly captured in the powerful and dramatic pictures taken by Frank Hurley, the expedition's official photographer. These images constitute an amazing body of photojournalism created under the most adverse circumstances imaginable. As this book reveals, however, they are far more than visual reportage; they also are images of great artistry that capture the life-and-death drama that was played out against an arctic landscape of magnificent and terrible beauty.

    The story told here through Frank Hurley's lens began in the summer of 1914, when Shackleton and his crew set sail from England with the intention of being the first to cross Antarctica from one coast to the other, passing through the South Pole on the way. After five months they reached the freezing Weddell Sea and were within sight of land when the Endurance became trapped in the ice pack. Nine months later, the ship was finally crushed, leaving the crew stranded on drifting ice floes at the end of the earth. What followed is one of the most remarkable survival stories in the history of human exploration. Shackleton's men camped on the ice floes for five months before they escaped in their lifeboats and, after a harrowing five-day voyage, reached Elephant Island, a barren outcrop too remote for any hope of rescue. From there, Shackleton and five other volunteers set out for South Georgia Island andmiraculously reached their destination after traversing 850 miles of the fiercest seas on the face of the planet in an open lifeboat. There they raised help, and three months later, after three failed attempts, Shackleton made it back to Elephant Island with a rescue ship. Incredibly, every single one of his men survived. Almost as incredible is the fact that so much of this drama was captured on film by Frank Hurley, and that so many of these pictures survived. South with Endurance is the first book to reproduce a total of nearly 500 extant photographs, including many remarkable color images that have never been published before.

    Drawn from the archives of the Royal Geographical Society in London, the State Library of New South Wales in Sydney, and the Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge, the photographs are complemented by excerpts from Hurley's diary, a chapter about the expedition itself, a biographical essay, and commentary about Hurley's photographic techniques.

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    FRANK WORSLEY - Shackleton's Fearless Captain.
    By John Thomson. Hardback, 1.14kg, 200mm x 267mm, 216 pages, monochrome photographs.
    Frank Worsley is undoubtedly one of New Zealand’s greatest adventurers, a man regarded by Sir Edmund Hillary as ‘one of my heroes’. Born in Akaroa in 1872, he went to sea aged 15 as an apprentice on the sailing ships working between New Zealand and Britain.

    Worsley became the captain of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ship Endurance, which was trapped in pack ice on the 1914-1916 Imperial Trans-Antarctic expedition and slowly crushed. The crew of 28 spent over a year on the Antarctic ice before Shackleton, Worsley and four other men sailed a tiny lifeboat 1300 km across the wild, freezing Southern Ocean to the island of South Georgia, and their subsequent rescue. This appallingly arduous journey is widely regarded as on of the greatest survival stories of all time, and its success was entirely reliant on Worsley’s remarkable navigation skills, and greatly aided by his fearless seamanship.

    Worsley was more than just Shackleton’s ‘Skipper’ however. He was awarded the DSO and bar for bravery during World War I, and for the rest of his life he continued to seek out adventure wherever he could.

    This biography of Frank Worsley was originally published in 1998, and has been revised and updated to refresh a story that deserves to be retold for future generations. The story of this proud New Zealander’s remarkable approach to life, far from home, cannot help but inspire anyone who dares to lift their gaze above the ordinary.

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    SHACKLETON'S BOAT JOURNEY
    By F. A. Worsley. Pbk, 135mm x 215mm, 220 pages, monochrome photographs.
    This boat journey has as recently as 2001 been described as the longest and most arduous small boat journey on record. The author, Captain Frank Worsley, was a New Zealander who was also the Captain of Shackleton's ship Endurance. He was selected to accompany Shckleton and three others on the 800 mile boat journey because of his superior navigational ability, his considerable experience in sailing and handling small boats, and his great stamina, strength and positive attitude.
    It is a miracle that the journey succeeded, concluding as it did with the crossing on foot of South Georgia to summon help from a whaling station. This has only been accomplished once since then, by expert climbers using modern equipment and starting from a fitness base of rest, excellent health and proper feeding.
    Worsley was known as an excellent story-teller (one reason why he appealed to Shackleton), and his book is an absorbing narrative. It complements Shackleton's own account in South - the only other contemporary record of these events. It is very well illustrated with large photographs taken by Frank Hurley, inluding some of the final pictures taken with a "hand-held".

    NZ$38.00 + Delivery

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    ENDURANCE.
    By F.A. Worsley. Paperback, 139mm x 209mm, 310 pages. Monochrome photographs.
    First published in 1931, Endurance relates the riveting account of Sir Ernest Shackleton's doomed 1914-16 expedition to the Antarctic and its incredible rescue: After HMS Endurance stuck in Antarctic ice packs and then sank into the Weddell Sea, it's twenty-five crew members were forced to launch three lifeboats and sail, in miserable conditions, for barren Elephant Island. From there, Shackleton, Frank Worsley (captain of the Endurance), and four others set off in the largest of the lifeboats, the James Caird, to seek help eight hundred miles away at the whaling stations on the island of South Georgia. Endurance is not only a tale of courage and unrelenting high adventure but also a tribute to one of the most courageous leaders in the history of exploration.

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    A HISTORY OF ARCTIC EXPLORATION.
    By Matti Lainema & Juha Nurminen . Hardback, 252mm x 345mm, 349 pages. Monochrome and colour photographs, maps and illustrations.
    Documenting more than 2,500 years of Arctic exploration, from the earliest seafarers of antiquity and the great naval and mercantile voyages in search of the Northwest and Northeast Passages, to the conquest of the North Pole and even beyond, this book is the definitive account of explorations made throughout the great Northern polar expanse. For the first time, it brings together the major explorers from both East and West to present one of the most detailed and beautifully illustrated surveys of the region's history ever published.
    Drawing on many previously unseen charts, artworks and maps from major European museums, the extensive holdings of the Nurminen Foundation as well as private collections and archives, A History of Arctic Exploration reveals how this remote region was gradually explored and charted by men of supreme skill, courage and initiative, overcoming extreme conditions in almost incredible feats of endurance. Key figures such as Barents, Franklin, Nodenskjold, Peary, Nansen, Stefansson and Amundsen are discussed in depth, together with an evaluation of their achievments, showing how each contributed to our understanding of the Arctic. Many perished as the North defiantly held on to its secrets, ultimately proving that success could only be achieved by adapting to the extreme conditions, following the example of the indigenous people who had successfully inhabited the North for hundreds of years.
    Today, the future of the Arctic is of global concern. In recent years, climate change and sovereignty disputes over territory have highlighted this worrying reality, drawing much attention to the region. Yet the Arctic has always been an inspiring and fascinating place, as well as a source of much human drama due to its harsh landscape and demanding conditions. Arctic expeditions were motivated by many different factors, including the pursuit of fame, natural resources and scientific endeavour, but they can all be characterised by the uniquely human desire to push back frontiers. Collectively the accounts of such epic journeys form an absorbing and complex historical narrative, fully presented in this insightful and deeply resonant book.

    NZ$99.00 + delivery.

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    TERRA INCOGNITA.
    By Sara Wheeler. Paperback, 130mm x 197mm, 306 pages.
    After writing two highly praised travel books, Sara Wheeler was accepted by the American government to be the first foreigner on their National Science Foundation's Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. She spent seven months on the continent, travelling from the fabled Ross Ice Shelf to the Pole itself, the remoter reaches of the West Antarctic ice sheet, and the balmy Antarctic Peninsula. Terra Incognita is a meditation on the landscape, myths and history of one of the remotest parts of the globe, as well as an encounter with the international temporary residents of the region - living in close confinement despite the surrounding acres of white space - and the mechanics of day-to-day life in extraordinary conditions. Through Sara Wheeler, the Antarctic is revealed, in all its seductive mystery.

    NZ$31.00 + delivery.

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    MAWSON'S FORGOTTEN MEN.
    Edited By Heather Rossiter. Paperback, 1.0 kg, 205mm x 243mm, 300 pages, colour illustrations. Published 2011.
    The diary of Charles Turnbull Harrison, one of Douglas Mawson's 'forgotten men', takes readers on Mawson's legendary Australasian Antarctic Expedition to map the frozen continent. Harrison joined the expedition as a biologist and artist, a member of the Western Party based on Queen Mary Land. He was also a gifted writer and the diary he kept from December 1911 to March 1913 has been reproduced here for the first time.

    NZ$60.00 + delivery.

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    WHAT SHIP?. Lieutenant Harry Pennell's Antarctic Legacy
    By David L. Harrowfield. Hardback, 0.51Kg, 175mm x 248mm, 123 pages, monochrome and full colour photographs. Published 2013.
    The publication of this book marks the Centenary of Captain R.F. Scott's British Antarctic expedition 1910-1913 and asscociation with Oamaru.
    Of special interest is the mystery surrounding the arrival of the ship SS Terra Nova off the town at 2am on 9 Febraury 1913 along with various myths still cited over one hundred years later.
    This attractive hardcover Limited Edition book contains much information on the the expedition, the ship and the little known asscociation Oamaru has since had with Antarctica.
    Special features in this book:
  • Foreword by HRH Princess Anne, Patron UK Antarctic Heritage Trust.
  • Essay by Falcon Scott, Grandson of captain Scott.
  • 50 photographs with eight pages in colour.
  • Self-guide map with sites of related Antarctic interest.
  • Four appendices and a useful bibliography and index.

    Was NZ$70.00 + Delivery

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    POLAR HISTORY Page one.



    See also: Nautical History and Nautical Dictionaries

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